Customer-experience-influence-based pay

“People buy people first”
Scott Ginsberg (the nametag guy), author of Make A Name for Yourself

In our fast-paced world, most products and services can be duplicated or be closely duplicated without much effort. For most businesses, the only real distinction we have left is our people, or more precisely the experience that our people provide our customers.

Just like I believe that teachers have more day-to-day influence over our children than sports stars, I truly believe that the people that are in front of customers each and every day play more of a role in the daily satisfaction of each individual customer than most c-level people put together. If this is true, then why are front-liners (and teachers for that matter) paid so little? Why do we not pay according the amount of daily influence an employee has on our customer’s experience (providing that it is positive)?

Just a thought.

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4 Responses

  1. A very good thought, at that.

    In addition, why don’t those who are paid well (like managers, directors, etc.) spend more time with their front-liners if they’re convinced they actually have as much influence as you say they do (and they do).

    Probably cuz that kind of leadership is intense and time-consuming, but it is most certainly the most rewarding (on various levels).

  2. Thanks for the link love!

    Sweet ebook – it’s GOLD Jerry, GOLD!

  3. Brett,

    I’d love to see more mangers and such out on the front-lines…and I am not talking about the photo-ops. I’m talking about actually getting in front of customers to help them because it is the right thing to do.

  4. Scott,

    It is a pleasure to see you around these parts! Do you know how many times I go around saying “it’s gold Jerry, gold!” (or substituting the name with whomever I am speaking with)? I’ve got to stop (or may I should just embrace it and be known as the “Seinfeld Marketing Guy”?) Anyway, thanks for stopping by.

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